Turn 9

Since we’re drawing close to the end of the game, finishing at Turn 10 – with the majority of the firefights over don’t expect much in the way of drama and action.

Here’s the state of play at the beginning of Turn 9.

We’ve virtually secured the whole peninsula, with the fortress at Sevastopol being the Russian’s last stand. Surrounding and severely depleted of ground troops other than their navy, even the mighty Sevastopol will surely fall to the Third Reich!

My initial actions involve constructing railroad into Sarabuz to ease supplies to the troops at the front. They will get a hearty meal before the battle begins.

Looking closer at the business end of my offensive, you can see the 50th, the 22nd, and the 46th all poised to push forward and soak the South Western tip of the Crimea with German infantry. The 73rd are in support at Simferopol and we have more units stacked at Sarabuz readying up if needed.

The German jackboots begin to cross the Belbek River and march onto Sevastopol. With the 46th taking the coastal road from Yalta. Even the enthusiastic Rumanian forces of the 4th move forward to join in the attack.

Meanwhile along the backbone of the Peninsula, the 24th infantry are herded onto rail carriages and are strategically moved along the Dzhankoy/Parpach railway.

Passing around Dzhankoy (with the vain hope it affords me a hex or two more in movement terms).

And holding halfway down the eastern coastline. It looks like my efforts to reinforce the choke point on the eastern tip of the peninsula might be too little and too late.

The 24th can just about see the 132nd and their threatening defence to “stopper up” the crossing at Kerch.

Turn 9 was a very quiet turn, with no epic conflicts, but a gradual push forward to seize the victory. Still scored B against the Russian’s D, it looks like this is well and truly in the bag. And I can be proud when the acquisition of the Crimean peninsula is reported to the Fuhrer.

Come back next time for the final installment in this scenario!