Russo-German War – Crimean Break-in – Turn 2

Turn 2

At the beginning of Turn 2 I survey the railroad condition and the supply situation. I set about converting what I can from Russian to German railroad gauge, namely the area around Perekop and the eastern route into Dzhankoy. My immediate goal for railway construction is to converge the lines into Dzhankoy.

The initial positions on the Turn Deployment phase of Turn 2 are as follows. We have the 73rd and the 46th probing Perekop, however both units are showing troop losses (the number 1 in the top right hand corner of the chit). The 50th are in place holding Ishun and the 22nd are encircled inside of Dzhankoy.

I allocate the 2 replacements to the 73rd and the 46th. I then assign the BIA Naval force to provide Naval Fire Support, at the eastern side of Perekop in the Sivash Sea.

Moving onto the Air Ops phase, I set up a Combat Air Patrol (CAP) around Perekop (F8A) to keep enemy air intrusions to a minimum, and I order in Ground Support (F8B) on the eastern flank of Perekop.

As the Russian Air Ops plays out, it seems my CAP has succeeded in achieving air superiority in the area. The enemy planes retreat back to their airfields with a loss to show for it.

I move the 46th directly south of Perekop in readiness to attack, and move down the road to help with the defense of Dzhankoy. I also push the 50th on from Ishun to support the 22nd with the defense of Dzhankoy this turn. I order the 22nd to Dig in/Entrench.

The 1st Breakthrough attack is a large scale assault on Perekop itself.

As you can see we have 2 to 1 odds and the die rolls go against us. Resulting in an A1:D1 outcome.

However, we manage to secure a Pursuit and a Retreat so we’re able to push the 73rd forward and into Perekop itself.

The 22nd and 50th combine forces and harass the enemy 276th infantry stationed South West of Dzhankoy.

We get 5 to 1 odds, but rolls are high and we can only exert a single loss. A1:D1.

In pursuit, I push the 50th into the gap created by the 276th’s retreat. During the exploit/move phase, I bring up the 46th, hoping I can add more units into the defense of Dzhankoy in subsequent turns.

Concerned about the frailty of the 22nd, I move the 50th into Dzhankoy itself. I bring up the HQ’s forward to maintain contact with fighting units – they are now at the neck of the Crimea Isthmus.

During the Russian movement phase they push troops northwards to maintain the encirclement of Dzhankoy, as well as preparing a line of defense behind this.

I begin the 2nd Breakthough offensive phase, by striking once again at the enemy troops forced to leave Perekop.

We manage 2 to 1 odds, and the rolls result in a A1:D2 outcome. Taking losses (I think we lose our Naval Capacity sadly) we manage to push the Russians further away from the neck of the Crimean peninsula.

Continuing the punishment, the Russian 156th moved into range of the 46th, so I prepare an attack.

With 5 to 1 odds, we roll an advantage and pound the troops heavily with a A0:D3 outcome, wiping them out.

A combined push from the 22nd and the 50th inside of Dzhankoy hits the enemy 172nd Unit.

Its a tough fight, with 4 to 1 odds and a 4,4 roll. This drops out a A1:D2 outcome. Thinning out the encircling Russians only by a small amount.

At the end of the turn, after supply calculations you can see we’re graded C+, only slightly better than Historical results. However, we have sustained very light losses and have inflicted more losses.

Tune in for the next Turn soon…

  • gabeeg

    Stop it…just stop it….everytime you come up with an AAR (ok…not all the time but alot of the time) I end up feeling compelled to buy the game! I bought Decisive Campaigns last time when I had no intention of buying it…my kids are hungry!

    …Now I have to get one of the Schwerpunkt games…when I was never even tempted before.

  • jomni

    Oh you’re tempting me as well. But I already have WITE and that’s too many Eastern Front games already.

  • Scott

    What game is this? Sorry, I didn’t see post #1/turn #1.